newyorker:

Views of the 2012 Venus Transit (the last of our lifetime) were brought to the world in ways never before imagined, via orbiting spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope using the moon as a mirror, International Space Station astronauts, and, of course NASA broadcasting, live, via the web in high definition from ten locations around the world.” Here’s a selection of twelve such photographs from NASA and Flickr users: http://nyr.kr/Lwpn5z
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newyorker:

Views of the 2012 Venus Transit (the last of our lifetime) were brought to the world in ways never before imagined, via orbiting spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope using the moon as a mirror, International Space Station astronauts, and, of course NASA broadcasting, live, via the web in high definition from ten locations around the world.” Here’s a selection of twelve such photographs from NASA and Flickr users: http://nyr.kr/Lwpn5z
Zoom Info
newyorker:

Views of the 2012 Venus Transit (the last of our lifetime) were brought to the world in ways never before imagined, via orbiting spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope using the moon as a mirror, International Space Station astronauts, and, of course NASA broadcasting, live, via the web in high definition from ten locations around the world.” Here’s a selection of twelve such photographs from NASA and Flickr users: http://nyr.kr/Lwpn5z
Zoom Info
newyorker:

Views of the 2012 Venus Transit (the last of our lifetime) were brought to the world in ways never before imagined, via orbiting spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope using the moon as a mirror, International Space Station astronauts, and, of course NASA broadcasting, live, via the web in high definition from ten locations around the world.” Here’s a selection of twelve such photographs from NASA and Flickr users: http://nyr.kr/Lwpn5z
Zoom Info

newyorker:

Views of the 2012 Venus Transit (the last of our lifetime) were brought to the world in ways never before imagined, via orbiting spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope using the moon as a mirror, International Space Station astronauts, and, of course NASA broadcasting, live, via the web in high definition from ten locations around the world.” Here’s a selection of twelve such photographs from NASA and Flickr users: http://nyr.kr/Lwpn5z